Ethics Links
Home Ethics Links Ethics Codes USA Ethics Codes Global Interpreter Codes Events,Conferences Training Materials Ethics Columns Contacts

 

Home
Ethics Links
Ethics Codes USA
Ethics Codes Global
Interpreter Codes
Events,Conferences
Training Materials
Ethics Columns
Contacts

This page is a list of links to on-line materials published by courts, court systems, bar associations, commissions, institutes, and other professional organizations working in the areas of ethics, ethics codes, canons, and ethics training. 

Most Recent Addition(s):  February 2014, fixed and updated some of the broken links, including a link to the American Judicature Society.

 

horizontal rule

United States

bullet

The American Judicature Society is one of the primary organizations in the United States working in the area of judicial ethics.  The Society offers a number of ethics resources including an online resource library, ethics publications by subscription, and one of the most highly developed, comprehensive websites on judicial ethics in the United States.

 

bullet

The American Society for Public Administration has adopted an ethics code for government employees in general.  It's not specifically court-related, but it may be useful to someone drafting a code for any public agency.  As described on their website, a revision project is underway as of September 2012.  If the link doesn't work properly, you can also download the 2006 edition of the ASPA ethics code in Word format at this link.

 

bullet

The American Bar Association's Joint Commission to Evaluate the Model Code of Judicial Conduct has assembled a state-by-state directory of codes and canons for judges and judicial officers.  Click on the "Resources" tab in the left margin of their webpage to access the state-by-state directory.  Although the site is clearly not focused on general court staff, many judicial conduct codes refer or apply to court employees in some provisions so their site may still be useful to court managers (for example, Minnesota's code, Canon 3(B)(2) applies judicial standards of "fidelity and diligence" to court employees).     

 

bullet

Benjamin Cardozo Law School in New York assembled this list of of links to ethics codes and ethics opinions for all 50 States -- although the list is almost exclusively judge and attorney related, not for court staff.  Still, this is a rich, very interesting, and very helpful resource on court-related ethics.

 

bullet

The California Center for Judicial Education & Research offers a pretty cool online ethics training course for court employees based on a program developed by the California Judicial Administration Institute of California.  Although the web course was initially published as far back as 2003, the course is still useful and it's one of the few online ethics courses for court employees that we've found on the 'net.  The course presents hypothetical scenarios for each tenets of their code, and then asks a "What would you do?" question.  Geared to California court employees but the principles are still universal.  

 

bullet

The Center for the Study of Ethics in the Professions at the Illinois Institute of Technology in Chicago doesn't focus on courts or court employees, but they have collected over 1,000 ethics codes drawn from over dozens of different professions and general areas of work.  This is the single biggest collection of ethics codes we've found so far.  It also includes a huge bibliography on ethics codes, resources on how to draft codes, etc.  If you're trying to do some work in comparative ethics codes, this website is the place.

 

bullet

Cornell Law School's American Legal Ethics Library does an excellent job cataloging the canons, codes, opinions, and ethics enforcement structures in all 50 states in the US and the District of Columbia.  However, the materials do concentrate on ethics for judges and attorneys and generally do not include codes for administrative or clerical court employees. 

 

bullet

The Ethics Resource Center is a non-profit organization in Washington, DC "devoted to organizational ethics."  They've assembled a large collection of ethics-related web links and other materials on their website, including a page on ethics references specifically for government employees.  It also includes links to the federal (US) ethics codes for both judges and court staff.   Their main web address is www.ethics.org

 

bullet

The Institute for Criminal Justice Ethics is affiliated with John Jay College of the City University of New York.  The center and their website collects information about criminal justice and related ethics topics, research links, conferences, and training programs in ethics.  The center mostly focuses on law enforcement and criminal justice (obviously), rather than court employees or court staff generally.  

 

bullet

Institute for Local Self Government, JoAnne Speer, 2003.  Developing A Local Agency Ethics Code: A Process Oriented Guide.  For those thinking of drafting or adopting an ethics code, this is a good resource on developing codes, their purposes, goals, and different approaches to ethics code development.  (I wish I had read this book a long time ago to clarify my thinking on ethics code development.)  The Institute publishing this resource is funded by the Waste Management, Inc. Charitable Foundation, but don't let that throw you off.

 

bullet

The Josephson Institute for Ethics is a non-profit organization based in Los Angeles.  The Josephson Institute is one of Peter Kiefer's favorite resources.  The site offers a lot of useful materials, references, event announcements, and this page listing dozens of other ethics-related websites.   

 

bullet

The National Center for State Courts, headquartered in Williamsburg, Virginia offers a very well developed collection of model codes, samples, training guides, and other materials on ethics, especially for non-judicial or administrative court employees.  

 

bullet

New Ethic is a general ethics website edited or collected by Joseph B. Juhasz and Lester Shepard. Originally this site was developed or hosted at the University of Colorado, but now it appears to be independent.  It's a little philosophical and rambling and -- well, you'll see.  However, the site includes a huge list of online ethics links, references, institutes, study centers, advocacy organizations, ethics libraries, and about 50 ethics codes over a wide array of different professions.  (On our printer the list of links runs 12 single-spaced pages, just to give you an idea of the size of the collection.)    

 

bullet

The New Mexico Judicial Education Center has constructed an excellent, web-based tutorial for court employees on ethics and ethics codes.  Click on the "dilemma" links in the upper right corner of each ethics sub-topic to see the interactive hypothetical scenario questions. 

 

bullet

Professor  David Hricik at Mercer University School of Law in Macon, Georgia maintains www.hricik.com, an  interesting web site on ethics and risk management.  The site is mostly focused on ethics for attorneys and the practice of law rather than on court employees, but parts of the site may be useful to court managers.  Professor Hricik has also posted his  occasional ethics articles and lists a number of ethics-related "State Links" on the website.

 

bullet

The United States Office of Government Ethics is specifically and exclusively an executive branch agency, not court or legislative, but if you're researching public employee ethics in general, you might find this site helpful.  Many of the Common Ethics Issues listed on the site arise in the courts and legislative bodies as well as executive agencies.     

International/Other Countries

bullet

 Development of a Code of Ethics For Court Clerks/Romania  This link offers a copy of the report on an ethics training and development project for court clerks in Romania in 2005, conducted by the American Bar Association/Central European and Eurasian Law Initiative (ABA/CEELI) and funded by the US Agency for International Development (USAID).   American court employees will immediately recognize most of the hypothetical scenarios.  This reference is especially good because it includes detailed descriptions of the scenarios, how the sessions were conducted, and a long appendix of comparative ethics codes, including from the US.  Compiled 2005, published 2006, 88 pages, pdf.  For more reading on the ABA's program in general, is available at Romania Programs | Rule of Law Initiative.

 

bullet

The American Bar Association Rule of Law Initiative - Europe and Eurasia has developed a detailed assessment tool to measure the progress of judicial reforms in 30 different evaluation areas.  We have all these codes, but are they working, are they making any difference?  CEELI's Judicial Reform Index is one way to measure progress in a clear, systematic way.  Their web pages talk about the initiative in general and the "Judicial Reform Index" (JRI) in particular, and describes the reform indices or summaries of how a number of countries are doing using JRI's criteria.   For one example of how the evaluation criteria are structured and applied, here's a link to the report for Georgia (former Soviet Union, not USA).  ABA CEELI Legal Reform Index Georgia 2007.  Jump to page 11 for an example of the criteria ratings.